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The meticulous minds at Le Labo have transformed the retail shop above Rudy’s Barbershop at Ace Hotel New York into a world of olfactory wonder. The brainchild of maîtres parfumeurs Fabrice Penot and Edouard Roschi, Le Labo was founded in Grasse — France’s perfume capital — and reared in a small apartment in NYC. 
With the aura of an antique apothecary, this pop-up version of Le Labo’s signature perfume lab maintains the same exacting attention to detail they’re so adored for — with fragrances formulated on site by the staff’s skilled noses to ensure each bottle leaves the shop at its aromatic peak. 
The pop-up sweetens its fragrance offerings by including a selection of laundry detergents, home sprays and hand-made, 100% soy blended candles.

acehotel:

The meticulous minds at Le Labo have transformed the retail shop above Rudy’s Barbershop at Ace Hotel New York into a world of olfactory wonder. The brainchild of maîtres parfumeurs Fabrice Penot and Edouard Roschi, Le Labo was founded in Grasse — France’s perfume capital — and reared in a small apartment in NYC. 

With the aura of an antique apothecary, this pop-up version of Le Labo’s signature perfume lab maintains the same exacting attention to detail they’re so adored for — with fragrances formulated on site by the staff’s skilled noses to ensure each bottle leaves the shop at its aromatic peak. 

The pop-up sweetens its fragrance offerings by including a selection of laundry detergents, home sprays and hand-made, 100% soy blended candles.

acehotel:


In 1884, once he completed his military service, young Georges Meliès was sent to the other side of the Channel by his parents to learn English. In London, he was introduced to the magic shows of the famous duo Maskelyne and Cooke, which would highly inspire his work as a movie director a few years later.
With more than five-hundred movies and a daring character, Meliès literally transformed – or rather spurred the burgeoning of the cinema industry at the turn of the 20th century. By challenging his imagination, learning from technical mistakes and playing with the materiality of the tapes, Meliès was the first to introduce special effects in movies such as multiple exposures, time-lapse photography, growing or diminishing figures. 
In pushing the boundaries of creativity and perceived reality, Meliès was able to free himself from the linearity and regularity of the first film makers, becoming known and respected as the first “Cinemagician.” This coming Saturday, the Anthology Film Archives in New York celebrate the work of Georges Meliès by screening a selection of his most notable works.

acehotel:

In 1884, once he completed his military service, young Georges Meliès was sent to the other side of the Channel by his parents to learn English. In London, he was introduced to the magic shows of the famous duo Maskelyne and Cooke, which would highly inspire his work as a movie director a few years later.

With more than five-hundred movies and a daring character, Meliès literally transformed – or rather spurred the burgeoning of the cinema industry at the turn of the 20th century. By challenging his imagination, learning from technical mistakes and playing with the materiality of the tapes, Meliès was the first to introduce special effects in movies such as multiple exposures, time-lapse photography, growing or diminishing figures. 

In pushing the boundaries of creativity and perceived reality, Meliès was able to free himself from the linearity and regularity of the first film makers, becoming known and respected as the first “Cinemagician.” 
This coming Saturday, the Anthology Film Archives in New York celebrate the work of Georges Meliès by screening a selection of his most notable works.

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Ace’s own actor and playwright Jesse Jensen created some serious magic in New York a few weeks ago with his one-night-only performance “The Untold Story of John Wilkes Booth.”  

The one-man play, written by Jensen and directed by Adam Knight of Slant Theater Project, takes a unique and piercing look into the soul of America’s most notorious assassin. Jensen as John Wilkes Booth is charming, intense, intimate and even funny, as he exposes the complex life and times of the once famous actor and what drove him to shoot the President.

People came, they laughed, they cried, and apparently they are asking for more.

Go Jesse. We will be keeping our eyes open for the future of your play.

acehotel:

Nation of Two, the third part of Love Kills Demons, a twelve part video series by Jim Helton on Chris Rubino’s work and world highlights the powerless nature of the spectator’s eye when exposed to the artist working on his canvas.

The creative process that allows the artist to start on a blank page and settle down on his achievement is purely personal, spontaneous and ungraspable; it belongs to him and him only. You can read more about Chris Rubino here.

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London-based poet, model and Ace friend Jack Royle recently released his first video, Chicken Town. This homage to John Cooper Clarke’s 1980’s "Evidently Chickentown" not only honors the English punk-poet but first and foremost resonates as the vivid testimony of a young lad in the jungle of the city, striving to speak up for himself.
Time has passed but the feelings remain unchanged.

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He who binds to himself a joyDoes the winged life destroy;But he who kisses the joy as it fliesLives in eternity’s sunrise.
Eternity, William Blake

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He who binds to himself a joy
Does the winged life destroy;
But he who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in eternity’s sunrise.

Eternity, William Blake

acehotel:

Dan Cassaro, a man of many talents and long-time Ace collaborator — you might recognize his work in room 617 or remember his gallery show from a few months back — proposed to his scientist extraordinaire and highly adorable girlfriend Niamh at Ace Hotel New York. 

He wrote a song, recorded it, pressed it on vinyl and played it for the occasion — and even though that sounds really unromantic and boring, she still said yes. 
We’re honored to be a (little) part of their story, and wish them all the best in the world. 

acehotel:

Dan Cassaro, a man of many talents and long-time Ace collaborator  you might recognize his work in room 617 or remember his gallery show from a few months back  proposed to his scientist extraordinaire and highly adorable girlfriend Niamh at Ace Hotel New York.

He wrote a song, recorded it, pressed it on vinyl and played it for the occasion  and even though that sounds really unromantic and boring, she still said yes.

We’re honored to be a (little) part of their story, and wish them all the best in the world. 

acehotel:

On September 6 we celebrated New York Fashion Week with the launch of the i-D Magazine retrospective, now on display in our gallery space. The ongoing exhibit showcases a selection of iconic covers from the always surprising, continuously inspiring magazine.

Started as a London street-style fanzine in 1980 by former Vogue art director Terry Jones, i-D quickly became a staple in avant-garde culture by challenging the imaginative boundaries of its contributors, speaking to a burgeoning and ever-more-connected global creative culture without losing any of that daring, witty and spontaneous British spirit that we love so much. A veritable who’s-who of past and present kings of fashion, photography and art were catapulted into international recognition in the pages of the magazine — and the opportunity to wink at the world from the front cover of i-D has become a coveted badge of honor.
If you find yourself in The City over the next few days, swing by the exhibition and take a look (pun intended) at some of Terry Richardson, Ellen von Unwerth, Juergen Teller’s best cover portraits. It’s free and open 24/7 until September 27.

acehotel:

On September 6 we celebrated New York Fashion Week with the launch of the i-D Magazine retrospective, now on display in our gallery space. The ongoing exhibit showcases a selection of iconic covers from the always surprising, continuously inspiring magazine.

Started as a London street-style fanzine in 1980 by former Vogue art director Terry Jones, i-D quickly became a staple in avant-garde culture by challenging the imaginative boundaries of its contributors, speaking to a burgeoning and ever-more-connected global creative culture without losing any of that daring, witty and spontaneous British spirit that we love so much. A veritable who’s-who of past and present kings of fashion, photography and art were catapulted into international recognition in the pages of the magazine — and the opportunity to wink at the world from the front cover of i-D has become a coveted badge of honor.

If you find yourself in The City over the next few days, swing by the exhibition and take a look (pun intended) at some of Terry Richardson, Ellen von Unwerth, Juergen Teller’s best cover portraits. 
It’s free and open 24/7 until September 27.